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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in which the wall street dragged america and the world economy under their funeral pyre i realize s
that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
. beginning with bob allison from esa chair of the history department at the university just on this tree. yes it teaches at harvard extension school in a suffered several books on the american revolution, most recently a 2011 book entitled the american revolution, a concise history. he is the vice president of the cornell society massachusetts, trustee of the uss comes to touche museum also in the freedom trail and the commonwealth to see them in boston. he also serves the bostonian society as a member of our board's advisory committee. so with that, bob alice in. [applause] >> next we'll move to jon kyl. john does a curator of the book lost in 1775 from a site dedicated to history, analysis and unabashed gossett asserted the american revolution inkling. recently completed a study in general washington during the siege of the national park service. he saw soviet about doing good count watchman at the boston massacre, the way the encrypt these in 1765 in the towns celebration. ask them about the crazy event annually. he has lectured on many historical societies, including this one. thought --
the vote we had a wonderful ceremony in the dirksen building honoring bob dole. you see, yesterday was the international disability rights day. international disability rights day yesterday. so they wanted to honor bob dole for all he'd done, and it was a wonderful event, wonderful. i saw people over there honoring bob dole for all the work he he'd done on disability rights who voted against the bill today. i saw them, i thought wait a minute, since they're going to honor all the work bob dole had done on disability and bob dole was one of the strongest supporters of the crpd as it's called, came over here today in his wheelchair with his wife, former senator elizabeth dole. and yet -- and yet people voted against it. i don't get it. veterans. mr. president, there was a young veteran sitting in the gallery today and i met him yesterday the first time, senator kerry spoke at length about him, his name is dan brzezinski and i'm going to ask consent to put his op-ed in the record at the conclusion of my speech. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: as i also want to pu
that is being managed by the real bob sullivan. the genius on the other side of the hudson. let's welcome bob sullivan. >> so, let's cut to the chase. everything san know everything there is to know. >> i am thinking of all the result is ino, and most of them he knew first. there are a lot of our solvents. it might not be me here tonight. thank you so much. we should stop right there. i'm so happy. and also -- >> that's fine. i can read from your book. >> it would be a better night. i know that it would be a better night. when i write books it is how long can you put off not writing the book. i won't write down one. and then a couple of books or ideas keep coming back. there are a lot of them, but i couldn't beat it down. the air about the war. it's foggy. the other project that turns out to be one of my big projects or something is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to dis
that we need a dialogue and much of the time whether it is bob costas getting in trouble or the doctors in florida told they can't talk about it or the military saying they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical we need to deal with this issue because it's important. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: i've always felt the gun control side that we want to talk and maybe the other side doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get to this table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out and get some sense -- good to talk to you. that was "after words" book tv signature program - which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv, at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" on line. ago to booktv.org and click on "after words" and the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >>> with a month left in 2012,
of the time of its bob costas kidded tripler doctors in florida or the military saying they can't talk about it were people going hysterical, we need to do with this issue. >> guest: we do what i hope we will. so far so to come. >> host: i've always felt that the gun-control side who want to talk, but i want to try anything to get them to the table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out. >> guest: thank you for the discussion. >> dallas "after words" in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists, public policymakers, legislators and others familiar with material. "after words" airs every week and on booktv, 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. sunday at 12:00 a.m. on monday. you can also watch online. go to booktv.org and click on afterwards and mysterious and topics list only if the recited page. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors embracing investigative reporting. the point be seen over the years is not just economics. it's a discomfort investigative reporting causes in the newsroom because his troubled
] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
from scott and let's go to bob. >> i want to comment, getting players engage is very important. i got to be careful but the three pilot programs, one of the aspect that was really beneficial is nfl alumni players came out and they were genuinely presenting their feelings about the game and talking openly to parents, in northern virginia, made a real difference and one of the points you made is how we come together, and the science and medical industry that we have to embrace that and act accordingly but i am pleased with the players association and the nfl and encouraging their players to come out and engage parents to talk about what is going on and parents are asking hard questions but in the end you want to be informed demand there is a movement. there are steps being taken to try to address this complex issue and the conversation will continue but they are definitely engaging. >> this conversation started with the idea of 14 and under so i will give you the comment. >> thanks very much. let me wrap quickly by saying what i started with, it is great that all of us understand no bra
of the time whether it's bob costas getting in trouble for talking about it or doctors in florida told they can't talk about are the military told they can't talk about it or people just going hysterical, we need to do -- deal with this issue. >> guest: i hope we will but so far -- >> host: again the gun control side we want to talk and maybe that their site doesn't but i'm willing to try anything to get them to the table. thank you for writing the book and hopefully we can get the word out. thank you for the discussiodiscussio n. >> guest: good to talk to you. >> that was supple and booktv's signature program in which authors of the latest nonfiction books are interviewed by journalists public year's legislatolegislato rs and others familiar with their material. after words airs every weekend at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9:00 p.m. on sunday -- though you can also watch on line. go to booktv.org incorporated click on supple and in the topics list on the upper right side of the page.
that in this country should never have a situation. >> great examples. >> we had a great team headed by bob and courtney who are real heroes. we have a good system to track what we're seeing. just break down what we saw on election day. about 32% of the issues we saw were related to ballot shortages and capacity issues. basically lack of resources. 20% came from the overuse of provisional ballots. we were saying this over and over again when it should not, voters should not have been given a provisional ballot but were. a lot of that was about training. a lot of it was about misunderstanding. 16% of the problems with oversight issues. machine problems, polls opening late, different issues with the actual site. then the rest all in single digits have do with a bunch of other things. and we were sitting issues here and there, and we don't just see don't just see the election date anymore as election day. we see it as early voting time. a lot of these issues we saw leading up to election day, and thankfully and lawsuits that have girly but we were able to address those issues far in advance wh
mark bob john and david and the entire family most of which is with us here in the gallery today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i am also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate including by my count, more than 300 senators hundreds of personal and committee staff members and more than a thousand students in turns. in my experience it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote oneself to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best the senate is one of the founders most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states. some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few times in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way i hesitate to describe our current state as of the most partisan ever but i do believe that as an
a second bite at the apple for bob. >> thank you. we are all familiar with the statistics. the u.s. spends on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. i was surprised to hear at a recent conference exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups. for seniors and people with disabilities. which raises the question in my mind, would it be better for us to try to rebalance our spending in the direction that allow people to stay in their homes, functioning well instead of institutionalizing them. which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens. because it makes no sense. we know that it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much support structures that i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized and long-term care and other settings, they are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat. most of the people were who are able to be treated within
to many of you called the criterion by scott armstrong and bob woodward, really a great book on this real first behind the scenes book. the theme of the book with all the justices, regardless of politics couldn't stand warren burger. they thought he was a pompous. that sort of contentiousness is in the rule more than the exception in the history of the supreme court. i don't know how many of you have had the misfortune to hear that justice is served from 1914 to 1941 name james mcreynolds, who such an appalling anti-semite ditties stick it a family whenever justice cardozo would speak. a cantankerous one summer had a car accident and drove his car off a cliff in the first question of who inhabit the corba service felix frankfurter at the time they hated each other so much they thought the frankfurter might've driven him off. [laughter] i was hoping a teacher and a list that i would find this cd center of the rehnquist court and the history. to my great disappointments of the journalists, but so much satisfaction as a citizen, i went rehnquist is very popular among his colleagues. he basic
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
bob barnett, who is the agent of senators and house members who write books and also cab net members and presidents, and we said -- and also cabinet members and presidents. and we said, you know, we'd like to get together and write a book and h we immediately got togethr and wrote a book. and she got a writer who went to each of us and interviewed us and wrote our stories, which were in our own words, and we got together and decided to give all of the proceeds to the girl scouts of america, which was a common organization that had affected almost every one of the women at the time. girl scouts giving leadership capabilities to the girls in our country and i've been a girl scout, barb had been a girl scout. so our book is still in print, and it has raised tens of thousands -- if not hundreds of thousands -- of dollars for the girl scouts to continue their leadership programs. and it all came from something that we learned about each other. and i think that the multiple myeloma, which my brother has and which geraldine fe ferraro , was another area in which barbara and i boun bonded, a
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
. david herring, kent hall, who died on timely death working for me, care are garland, bob vanhuevland, wally, my legislative director who was with me for more than 20 years, tom mar, jerry gaginas, we all fondly call "mom," because she cracks the whip and makes sure the trains run on time. mary naylor, also has been with me more than 20 years. my deputies there, john rider and joel friedman, who have done extraordinary work on behalf of the people of this country. stew nagerka, who is going to help me with charts today, my longtime communication communics director, and so many more. and most  of all to my family, my wife lucy, who has been my partner through all this, was my campaign manager when i first ran for the united states senate, my daughter jessie, who in in many ways has perhaps sacrificed the most because when you're in this job, you miss birthdays, you miss other important events. but she has been a great daughter, and she was here last night for our farewell party. and we had a lovely time. our son, ivan, and his wife kendra, who are in oregon where they have a small far
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)